Industrial Technology

  • All Industrial Technology courses will count for Practical Art credit. Students need 1.0 Practical Art credit to graduate. If a student has fulfilled the Practical Arts requirement, courses will count towards elective credits (7.5 required).


    5240  INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY
    Credit:  1 unit
    Open to Grades:  9-12
    This is an introductory course in which you can learn the basics of electronics.  This course is highly recommended for all students who plan to major in an engineering field of study during college.  Some of the areas you will learn are basic electronics, careers in electronics, and basic electronic circuits. You will use this information to conduct experiments and build electronic projects.  Some of the projects you can build are: a three channel light show that flashes colored lights to the music on your stereo or radio; and intercom, a switch that you touch and it turns on a light; an electronic fish caller, strobe, a fuzz box for guitar distortion, LED flashers, and many others.  One-third of the class is spent in the classroom, and the rest is in lab work. Student material fees may apply.


    5260  ADVANCED ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY
    Credit:  1 unit 
    Prerequisite:  Intro. to Electronic Tech and Instructor approval
    Open to Grades:  10-12
    In this class, you will learn about power supplies, radio and stereo amplifiers, and oscillator circuits that cause electronic clocks to keep time.  You will learn about basic digital circuits and controls used in computers. We will work with electronic switching and power control circuits. You will conduct some experiments and build projects incorporating the theories you learn.  Some of the projects include a 4-channel light show that flashes lights to music, electronic dice, a stereo powered booster amp, exploding star with LED's and others. About one-third of the class will be spent in the classroom, and the rest will be working in the lab.  Student material fees may apply. Note:  An application for an H grade may be requested for this course.

    5350 INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTIC ENGINEERING
    Credit: 1 Unit
    Open to Grades: 9-12
    This hands-on introductory Robotic Engineering course is designed to introduce the students to the field of robotics and computer programming. This class immerses the student in real world science and technology challenges. Over the course of the year, students strategize, design, build, program (Robot C+) and test autonomous robots using LEGO MINDSTORMS®, TETRIX®, and other models. Heavy emphasis is placed on acquiring programming skills in relation to motors, servos and sensors. This course will provide the opportunity for students to explore careers in science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM). Students will also develop career and life skills including critical thinking, time management, collaboration and communication. Students in Robotic Engineering are strongly encouraged to participate in the Statesman Robotics Team and the FIRST® Tech Challenge.

    5357  ADVANCED ROBOTIC ENGINEERING
    Credit:  1 Unit 
    Prerequisite:  Introduction to Robotic Engineering
    Open to Grades:  10-12
    Advanced Robotic Engineering allows students to continue to explore mechanical systems, electronics and programming. Primarily a lab experience, this class provides students opportunities to design, build and program functional autonomous robots from a variety of professional platforms.  Students will design machines that can navigate diverse environments, recognize other robots, and manipulate objects. Unlike robots utilized in the introductory class, all Advanced Robotics are expected to be totally autonomous, meaning they should solve the problem with no human intervention. The class also explores other STEAM topics, such as digital logic, branding and artificial intelligence. Students will also develop career and life skills including critical thinking, design, project management, teamwork, strategic thinking and Gracious Professionalism-a philosophy that encourages high-quality work, emphasizes the value of others, and respects individuals and the community. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in the Statesman Robotics Team and the FIRST® Robotics competition.  Students may repeat this class.

    5335  MODERN AUTOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE                                                                  
    Credit:  1/2 unit                  
    Open to Grades:  10-12
    Limitations:  No concurrent or previous automotive classes.  You do not have to take this class to take Power Technology.
    This is a co-educational course designed to introduce students to the basic operating principles and appropriate maintenance  of the modern automobile This course is designed for any student that anticipates owning an automobile.The major topics to be covered are engine operation, preventive maintenance, purchase of automotive products and how to buy a car.  The student will complete the following activities on an automobile: how to change a flat tire, change oil, lubricate the chassis, jump start a car, add/change antifreeze, and how to perform routine maintenance.  Additional individual activities may also be completed during class based on student needs. Approximately 60 percent of the class time is devoted to lecture and discussion, while approximately 40 percent of the time will be spent in the lab. Students do not need a driver’s license or currently have a car to participate in this class.  A lab fee may apply.


    5300  POWER TECHNOLOGY                                                                                                   
    Credit:  1 unit                                                                   
    Open to Grades:  10-12
    Students do not have to take Modern Auto Maintenance before taking this course.
    Power Technology is a beginning power and transportation course designed to introduce students to the basic operating principles of the internal combustion engine and the automobile.  This course is the starting point for the hands-on learner. Students interested in the mechanical world, engineering, STEM, fabrication, power and energy as well as transportation are encouraged to take this course.. Each student will disassemble, clean, measure, machine, assemble and troubleshoot a one cylinder engine.  Students will perform preventive maintenance and make basic automotive repairs. Other topics to be covered include hydraulics, pneumatics, and alternative energy. The major lab experiences will include small engine overhaul, automotive maintenance, brake work, lubrication, tire demount/mount and balancing. Students will engage in basic ARC and MIG welding as well as the use of a plasma cutting machine. Basic metals fabrication allows students to explore their creative side.  All students will engage in occupational opportunities associated with the Power and Energy field as well as Modern Manufacturing. Approximately 40% of the class time is allotted for classroom presentation and discussion. The remainder of the class time is devoted to lab work. Student material fees may apply.


    5325/5340  AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY/ADVANCED AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
    Credit:  1 unit                                                  
    Open to Grades:  11-12
                                        

    Auto Technology is a continuation of an in-depth study of automotive systems as well as automotive maintenance.  This hands-on course is designed to provide  the most possible hands-on experience in a lab setting for students interested in mechanics, engineering, STEM and manufacturing. This course will develop problem solving abilities through the proper use of lab equipment and provide occupational information for the college-bound student and the non-college bound student alike.  Major shop activities include a complete engine overhaul and the servicing of automotive systems including starting/charging, fuel delivery, ignition, brakes, exhaust and emission controls. Activities include identification, diagnosis, troubleshooting, repairs, estimating and billing.  Students will be introduced to collision repair technology. Students will use basic techniques to repair collision damage. Activities include dent repair, frame clamping, pulling techniques, measuring, panel alignment, surface preparation, and refinishing.  There is a heavy emphasis on technique and both personal and material safety. Students should also expect to engage in metal fabrication, processes and techniques used in a wide variety of occupational settings. Approximately 30 percent of course time is allotted for classroom presentation and discussion. The remainder of class time is devoted to lab work. Student material fees may apply. Note:  An application for an H grade may be requested for this course.

    5331  AUTO LAB - 1ST SEMESTER                                                                                              

    Credit:  1/2 unit                  
    Prerequisite:  Automotive Technology/can be taken concurrently with Automotive Technology             
    Open to Grades:  11-12
    This is a first semester lab course designed to provide additional lab experience.  Activities to be covered are diagnostic computer tests, simulated Missouri State Inspection, and problem-solving techniques common in the transportation field. Students will choose a long term project from the fields of Automotive Maintenance, Collision Repair or Fabrication and Manufacturing.  Student material fees may apply.


    5332  AUTO LAB - 2ND SEMESTER                                                                                                             
    Credit:  1/2 unit                      
    Prerequisite:  Automotive Technology/can be taken concurrently with Automotive Technology                        
    Open to Grades:  11-12

    This is a second semester lab course designed to provide additional lab experience.  Activities to be covered are diagnostic computer tests, simulated Missouri State Inspection, and problem-solving techniques common in the transportation field. Students will choose a long term project from the fields of Automotive Maintenance, Collision Repair or Fabrication and Manufacturing.  Student material fees may apply.


    5030  HOME MAINTENANCE
    Credit:  1/2 unit                                                                 
    Open to Grades:  9-12
    This one-semester course is designed to teach basic skills, techniques, and materials used in general and household repair.  Areas to be covered are as follows: basic use of hand tools, simple repairs, basic electrical wiring, identifying/troubleshooting systems in the home (plumbing, electrical, HVAC), exterior and interior maintenance, and use of power tools. In covering the above areas, one-fifth of the class will be spent learning skills, techniques, and principles in a typical classroom situation. The majority of the class will be used to construct projects using the skills and techniques learned in class. In-class projects include but are not limited to:  wall frame construction, basic electrical installation and repairs, basic plumbing repairs, install/repair drywall, and install/repair asphalt roofing shingles. Most written work is completed during class time, very little work outside of class should be expected.  Student lab/material fees may apply.

    5060 WOODS AND CONSTRUCTION
    Credit: 1 unit                                               
    Open to Grades:  9-12
    Woods & Construction is a year-long beginning material and processes course designed to expose students to the skills pertaining to machine, hand tool, and material use in industry.  Students will have the opportunity to learn in a hands-on setting about processes of design, construction principles, assembly, and evaluation found in production.  Students interested in construction, engineering, STEM, fabrication as well as learning about new technologies being utilized are encouraged to take this course.    Students will complete projects to reinforce concepts learned in the classroom.  Some of the beginning projects students will complete include: end-grain cutting boards, bandsaw boxes, wall clocks, and bird houses.  After completion of the beginning project, students will choose their next project.  The possibilities are endless.  Approximately 75% of class time will be spent in the woods lab.   Student material fees may apply.

    5080 ADVANCED WOODS AND CONSTRUCTION
    Credit: 1 unit
    Prerequisite: Proficiency in Woods and Construction I
    Open to Grades:  10-12
    Advanced Woods & Construction is a year-long advanced material and processes course, allowing students to hone skills pertaining to machine, hand tool, and material use in industry. Students will have the opportunity to further develop their knowledge of principles of design, construction and assembly as well as evaluation in the manufacturing world. Students interested in construction, engineering, STEM, fabrication as well as learning about new technologies being utilized are encouraged to take this course.  Additional topics covered in class are: industrial manufacturing, technology of tools, designing, decorative effects, diverse assembly methods, and quality control.  Each student will design a mass production project.  The remainder of the projects and problem-solving activities will be the choice of the student with the instructor’s approval.  Approximately 85% of class time will be spent in the woods lab.   Student material fees may apply. 

    5110 PLTW - INTRODUCTIONS TO ENGINEERING AND DESIGN
    Credit: 1 Practical Art or Elective
    Prerequisite: None
    Open to Grades: 9-12
    Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) focuses on developing problem solving skills using a design development process that is used by engineers. IED is a hands-on class where students create models of product solutions, analyze them and communicate their solutions with presentations to the class. Much of the modeling is done with 3D modeling software.

    5125 PLTW - CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE
    Credit: 1 Practical Art or Elective
    Prerequisite: None
    Open to Grades: 10-12
    Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA) focuses on the fields of Civil Engineering and Architecture. The major focus of the course is a long-term project that involves the development of a local property site. As students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture, they apply what they learn regarding architectural styles, affordable housing design, and commercial development to design and develop a property. Students work in teams, using state-of-the-art CAD software to solve real-world problems and communicate solutions to hands-on projects and activities.