Communication Arts

  • Students must earn 4.0 English credits to graduate from WGHS.

    3270 FRESHMAN LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grade: 9
    Freshman Literature and Composition is a one-year course incorporating the study of language skills and writing with an introduction to various literary genres. The course provides a foundation and background for students who are college-bound and expect to take advanced English courses in the later high school years. Students study the novel, short story, drama, and poetry (including the epic). Some major works studied include The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet and Homer's Odyssey. Optional works include A Separate Peace, Of Mice and Men, Lord of the Flies, and Purple Hibiscus. In addition, students read short stories by such authors as Poe and O. Henry; and poetry by such authors as Robert Frost and Langston Hughes. Vocabulary study draws from the literature or from word lists appropriate for this grade level. Students study the process of writing from the generation of ideas through revision and editing. All students write several multi-paragraph papers each semester and study the various modes including narration, explanation, persuasion, and description. In addition, students study the grammar and mechanics of English and apply those skills to expository compositions, including the I-Search paper. This course emphasizes the development of study skills including organization and long- and short-term planning. Because of the nature of this course and the material covered, students do a considerable amount of reading and writing outside the classroom. Opportunities to earn Honors grades are given each semester.

    9060 GIFTED & TALENTED 9
    Credit: 1 unit
    Prerequisite: In Gifted and Talented Program
    Open to Grade: 9
    Gifted 9 is a language arts course for gifted freshmen. Its purpose is to immerse gifted students in literature, writing assignments, activities, and projects that will challenge them while addressing their unique learning styles and affective needs. Freshmen English is a foundations course, so students will study the foundations of literature and the English language. Therefore, this course will cover such basics as the epic, Greek and Shakespearean tragedies, the novel, poetic techniques, the short story, and creative non-fiction. Students will practice various writing techniques. Relevant historical and cultural material will be addressed as well, in order that students may better understand overarching themes and archetypal patterns. Heavy emphasis will be placed on grammar (particularly sentence structure, clarity, and punctuation) and vocabulary (word origins, analogy-building, and ACT/SAT test prep). The largest assignment of the year is the I-Search research project, which also involves out-of-school job shadowing. It will be written in the second semester. Students are required to read four books over the summer. Note: This course will count as a weighted grade.

    3040 ENGLISH 10
    Credit: 1 unit
    Enrollment: based on reading assessment and teacher recommendation
    Open to Grade: 10
    This full-year course, designed for tenth-grade students who read below grade level, emphasizes the basic principles and terminology of expository writing and literature. It includes the study of literary works, grammar, vocabulary, and composition. Writing instruction includes paragraph development, the personal essay, the critical paper, and the research report. Students have daily homework, including frequent reading and writing assignments. At least three formal essays are required each semester.

    3450 WORLD LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grades: 10
    This full-year college preparatory course for sophomores is designed to prepare students for the advanced English courses offered to juniors and seniors. Since it combines a study of literature with that of composition, reading and writing assignments are frequently connected. Vocabulary study draws from the literature or from word lists appropriate for this grade level. Students improve their linguistic and analytical skills by interpreting literature in terms of such elements as theme, characterization, structure, symbolism, irony, and figurative language. Organized around world literature, readings may be chosen from the following: Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar or Macbeth, Camus’ The Stranger, Satrapi’s Persepolis, Hesse’s Siddhartha, Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex, Wiesel’s Night, Orwell’s 1984, Mishima’s The Sound of Waves, Markandaya’s Nectar in a Sieve, Coelho’s The Alchemist, Esquivel’s Like Water for Chocolate and Dante’s Inferno. Equal emphasis is placed on the writing process, particularly sentence structure, paragraph organization and development, diction, and mechanics. Students concentrate on form and technique in writing four to six major compositions per semester, including personal essays and critical essays of varying lengths. Also included in the first semester is the researched argument paper. Students sit for the Missouri End of Course Exam in April, which will comprise 10% of the semester grade.

    3455 HONORS WORLD LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION
    Credit: 1 unit
    Recommendation: Students who earned an “A-” or better in both semesters of Freshman Literature & Composition have experienced an appropriate yet challenging placement in this course; one semester of Freshman H-Grade strongly recommended.
    Open to Grade: 10
    This rigorous, accelerated course for sophomores is designed for the student who is ready for a challenging and intense English experience. Organized around works of world literature, readings may be chosen from the following: Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing, Camus’ The Stranger, Hesse’s Siddhartha, Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex, Orwell’s 1984, Dickens’ Great Expectations or A Tale of Two Cities, Mishima’s The Sound of Waves, Markandaya’s Nectar in a Sieve, Esquivel’s Like Water for Chocolate, Satrapi’s Persepolis, and Dante’s Inferno. Students may also expect to read extensive selections of nonfiction and poetry. Equal emphasis is placed on the writing process, particularly sentence structure, paragraph organization and development, diction, and mechanics. Students concentrate on form and technique in writing six or more major compositions per semester, including researched essays, rhetorical analysis, and critical essays of varying lengths. Also included in the first semester is the persuasive research paper. Students sit for the Missouri End of Course Exam in April, which will comprise 10% of the semester grade. Summer reading is required. Note: This course counts as a weighted grade.

    9070 GIFTED & TALENTED 10
    Credit: 1 unit
    Prerequisite: In Gifted and Talented Program
    Open to Grade: 10
    Gifted 10 is a language arts AP prep course for gifted sophomores. Its purpose is to immerse gifted students in literature, writing assignments, activities, and projects that will challenge them while addressing their unique learning styles and affective needs. Students will study the literary and cultural movements of Europe, beginning with the Anglo-Saxon Era and moving chronologically forward to address the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Romantic Era, Enlightenment, Realism, Modernism, and Surrealism. They will study seminal literary works and artistic forms from each time period. Relevant cultural and historical background will also be addressed along the way to increase understanding of literary trends and genres. Grammar instruction is weekly, addressing in particular review of all material from the previous year as well as advanced sentence structure and diagramming. Vocabulary instruction will consist of test preparation, etymological studies, and analogy building. The largest writing assignment of the year is the persuasive research paper, which will be written in the second semester. Students are required to read four books over the summer. Note: This course will count as a weighted grade.

    3200 AMERICAN WRITERS
    Credit: 1 unit
    Enrollment: based on reading assessment and English teacher’s recommendation
    Open to Grade: 11
    In this year-long course, students focus on building skills that lead to their development as successful readers and writers. Students read literature by American writers from varied time periods and use that literature as stepping stones for creating their own messages and works of literature. Authors covered may include Maya Angelou, Mark Twain, Langston Hughes, Emily Dickinson, Chief Joseph, Tony Hillerman, and Toni Morrison. The compositions and types of literature students experience include letters, short stories, speeches, drama, new stories, novels, memoirs, essays, and poetry. Students use technology to do research and create essays, research papers, poetry, fiction and other creative works. Public speaking, interviewing, and role-playing facilitate student communication skills.

    3763 20th CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE & COMPOSITION
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grade: 11
    This college preparatory course provides an extensive study of literature, composition, grammar, and research techniques. Literary study will focus on influential modern American literature supplemented with relevant texts from the 19th through the 21st Centuries. Representative works may include Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms, Morrison’s Song of Solomon, Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire, Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Miller’s The Crucible, Krakauer’s Into the Wild, Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, and selected short stories and nonfiction. The course stresses composition as a process of critical analysis. Throughout the year, students will write multiple essays based on literature, exposition and argumentation, and research. Critical reading skills, ACT preparation techniques, and vocabulary development are emphasized throughout the year.

    3772/8120 HONORS US STUDIES AP/ACC
    Credit: Credit: 2 Units (1 unit English and 1 unit Soc. St.)
    Recommendation: Students who earned a “B” or better in Honors World Lit & Comp or “A-” or better in World Lit & Comp have experienced an appropriate yet challenging placement in this course.
    Open to Grades: 11
    Honors U.S. Studies, a rigorous, wide-ranging investigation into U.S. history and culture, stresses those skills requisite for the college-bound student. A two-period block of time is provided for it (though students receive separate grades in each half of the course). This course’s cross-disciplinary approach offers the students an opportunity to take a philosophical look into U.S. history, literature, and culture in unison. An English instructor and a social studies instructor teach full-time in the program. The social studies component of the course is a chronological study of American history beginning with the Age of Exploration and concluding with modern America. The literature in this course is also presented chronologically, and may include such works as Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Sinclair’s The Jungle, Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms, Morrison’s Sula, as well as numerous shorter works from various eras, including 18th century slave narratives. Students should expect to write multiple papers per semester in a variety of modes. Vocabulary study, critical thinking and reading skills, and grammar/editing techniques are stressed throughout the year. This class helps students prepare to take the Advanced Placement Test in American History and satisfies the American History requirement for graduation. Summer reading is required.
    Note 1: This course will count as a weighted grade and ACC is available in both English (3 hours) and social studies (3 hours per semester). AP credit is available for both portions of the course to those students who elect to take the exam.
    Note 2: Students enrolled in English 3772 must be enrolled concurrently in Social Studies 8120. Please see the Social Studies course descriptions for further information on the Social Studies portion of the course.

    3775 AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION
    Credit: 1 unit
    Recommendation: Students who earn a “B” or better in Honors World Lit. & Comp or “A-” or better in World Lit & Comp have experienced an appropriate yet challenging placement in this course.
    Open to Grade: 11
    AP Language and Composition is a college level course designed to prepare students to be able to write effectively and confidently in their future courses across the curriculum and in their professional and personal lives. Students will read a wide variety of predominantly non-fiction texts with an emphasis on American authors and essayists. The primary goal of these readings will be to analyze good writing by identifying and explaining the author’s techniques. Students should expect to write extensively and for a variety of purposes in order to develop their own stylistic maturity in the use of rhetorical strategies. Assignments will include creating and sustaining expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that introduce a complex central idea and develop it with appropriate evidence drawn from primary and/or secondary sources. Students can expect to conduct research requiring citation of primary and secondary sources with careful attention to inquiry and research. Students may also expect extensive work in grammar and vocabulary. Texts studied in whole or part include Nickel and Dimed, Fast Food Nation, Freakonomics, Into the Wild, Glass Castle,The Grapes of Wrath, The Great Gatsby, as well as extensive selections of essays. In May, students are encouraged to sit for the AP Language and Composition Exam. Competitive and selective colleges typically award credit for scores of 4 and 5.
    Note: This course counts as a weighted grade, and students may receive dual credit from UMSL.

    3700 AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE (GIFTED 11)
    Credit: 1 unit
    Prerequisite: In Gifted and Talented Program
    Open to Grade: 11
    Juniors in the Gifted and Talented Program will study fiction and nonfiction texts with emphasis on American authors and essayists, along with advanced composition and rhetorical strategies. This course focuses on critical thinking and literary analysis. Attention will also be given to students’ affective needs and present areas of interest. Some cross-disciplinary study will occur, particularly with history and the humanities. In addition, students may expect continued work in grammar and vocabulary in preparation for college admissions tests. Students are required to read four books over the summer. At the conclusion of this course, students will have the option to take the AP exam in Language and Composition. Note: This course counts as a weighted grade, and students may receive dual credit from UMSL.

    3685 AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grade: 12
    This year-long course is designed for the serious student interested in African-American heritage. Students study African-American writers and their contributions to the cultural development of this country. The course requires frequent independent reading, homework and group work, and class discussion. The literature—autobiographies, short stories, poetry, drama, and novels—are taught in chronological order. The course not only has the intent of exposing students to literature from the African-American community, but also enlightening them to the nuances of a culture. Through the readings and class participation, students experience the inner workings of this very rich heritage. The course covers the oral tradition in Africa, the Civil War, the Reconstruction Era, and the beginnings of the Harlem Renaissance. Semester II covers the end of the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the Civil Rights movement, and contemporary issues. Students may elect to take either Semester I, Semester II, or both. Specific works may include Black Like Me, The Color Purple, Invisible Man, A Lesson Before Dying, Piano Lesson, and Bluest Eye.

    3785 AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION ACC
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grade: 12
    Recommendation: Students who have earned an “A-” or better in 20th Century American Lit and Comp or have a “B-” or better in Honors U. S. Studies or AP Lang and Comp have experienced an appropriate yet challenging placement in this course.
    African American Literature and Composition ACC is a rigorous college-credit course for seniors interested in a disciplined study of African American literature and its cultural and historical context. Prospective students should be comfortable reading college-level texts and composing academic essays, particularly literary analysis. Through exploration of rich and challenging works, students will continue to develop close-reading and formal writing skills as well as explore the discipline of critical theory. Students should expect as many as six essays (both in-class and out-of class) per semester: this includes a particular focus on the college essay during the first month of school. Texts will include the following: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Beloved, Invisible Man, The Color Purple, The Piano Lesson, Fences, and numerous poems, essays, articles and excerpts. Summer reading is required. Note: This course counts as a weighted grade, and students may receive dual credit from UMSL.

    3745 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grade: 12
    This course is recommended for students who have taken Honors US Studies, American Lit./Adv. Comp. or American Writers. This year-long course prepares students for college and other post-secondary opportunities. Students strengthen their critical thinking skills by exploring contemporary readings, composing at least six formal papers, and practicing revisions and rewriting. Anchor papers include the college admission essay first semester and the multi-genre research paper second semester. Key texts for this class include college-level reading selections along with focused exercises in editing, refining sentence structure, and drafting coherent paragraphs and essays. Weekly vocabulary study involves learning Latin, Greek and French word parts with English derivations. Service-learning assignments connect literature study to hands-on experiences in the world outside of school.

    3790 ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION ACC
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grade: 12
    Recommendation: Students who have earned an “A-” or better in 20th Century American Lit and Comp or have a “B-” or better in Honors U. S. Studies or AP Lang and Comp have experienced an appropriate yet challenging placement in this course.
    This course coordinates the close study of a number of works in class with the students' outside reading. The student learns to respond to language with increasing sensitivity and discrimination and develops the ability to write in various forms. The course requires a challenging but reasonable investment of time. Works studied may include Beowulf, Canterbury Tales, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Waiting for Godot, Frankenstein, Heart of Darkness, Hamlet, The Secret Sharer, Pride and Prejudice, Brave New World, and Wuthering Heights. In addition, poetry of the Romantic Period in British literature and some twentieth century writers, including writers from Ireland, are studied. Students write the college essay as well as five other writing pieces. Instruction in grammar and vocabulary is given. Summer reading is required. Note: This course counts as a weighted grade, and students may receive dual credit from UMSL.

    3780 MODERN INTERNATIONAL LITERATURE ACC
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grade: 12
    Recommendation: Students who have earned an “A-” or better in 20th Century American Lit and Comp or have a “B-” or better in Honors U. S. Studies or AP Lang and Comp have experienced an appropriate yet challenging placement in this course.
    Modern International Literature is a rigorous course for college-bound seniors. It involves the study of college-level texts by authors from many nations and regions, which may include South America (Marquez, Borges), Great Britain/Ireland (Joyce, Yeats), Japan (short stories, poetry), China (short stories, poetry), West Africa (short stories, poetry), Europe (Kafka, Grass, Camus, Sartre, Lorca, Conrad), Russia (Solzhenitsyn, Gogol), and the U. S. (Morrison). Special stress is placed in this class on literary skills like close reading, interpretation of critical perspectives, literary terminology, and scholarly, formal writing (inside and outside of class). This class sharpens the skills needed for success on such formal/timed written assessments such as the ACT Written Section and advanced in-class college composition tests. Summer reading is required. Note: This course counts as a weighted grade, and students may receive dual credit from UMSL.

    3795 AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION
    Credit: 1 unit
    Recommendation: Students who have earned an “A” in 20th Century American Literature or “B+” in Honors U.S. Studies or AP English Language have experienced an appropriate yet challenging placement in this course.
    Open to Grade: 12
    Students learn to read British literature (fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry) for multiple meanings and interpret them for theme, symbolism, figurative language, and consideration of authorial influences using multiple critical approaches. Students also master composition skills such as grammar/usage, sentence structure, logical organization, controlling voice, and analytical argumentation. Studied works include Frankenstein; Wuthering Heights; Pride and Prejudice; A Tale of Two Cities; Heart of Darkness; Much Ado About Nothing; Brighton Rock; Boy, Snow Bird; Never Let Me Go; Othello; Mrs. Dalloway; The Importance of Being Earnest; and selections of romantic, metaphysical, modern, and contemporary poetry. Students write extensively both in and out of class. Students are encouraged to take the AP English Literature exam in May. Competitive and selective colleges typically award credit for scores of 4 and 5. Summer reading is required. Note: This course counts as a weighted grade, and students may receive dual credit from UMSL.

    3710 AP ENGLISH LITERATURE (GIFTED 12)
    Credit: 1 unit
    Prerequisite: In Gifted and Talented Program
    Open to Grade: 12
    The student will learn to read and critically analyze four genres of American and British literature; nonfiction, drama, fiction, and poetry. Particular emphasis will be placed on structural and literary analysis. History and cultural background will be provided. A student typically writes twelve critical essays, a college essay, poems, and a narrative. To increase vocabulary, the student completes weekly vocabulary lessons. In addition, students conduct an independent research project. Students are required to read four novels over the summer. At the conclusion of the course, students will have the option to take the AP exam in literature. Note: This course counts as a weighted grade, and students may receive dual credit from UMSL.

    READING CLASSES
    3045 READING 9
    Credit: 1/2 unit
    Enrollment: based on reading assessment and recommendation of 8th or 9th grade teacher
    Open to Grade: 9
    This class allows students to work individually to improve comprehension, vocabulary development, and study skills. A variety of materials are used in the class, including, but not limited to software, independent novels, class readings, newspaper articles, and timed reading passages. A majority of work is done individually based on the reading level of each student.

    3120 READING 10
    Credit: ½ unit
    Enrollment: based on reading assessment and recommendation of 9th grade English teacher
    Open to Grade: 10
    This course provides students the opportunity to build reading strategies, to expand vocabulary and to develop comprehension techniques through nonfiction and fiction texts, especially those connected to the World Literature course. Students practice skills necessary for critical reading and analysis of literature, efficient use of time, effective note-taking, studying and test-taking strategies. Reading assessment will determine class placement.

    3125 READING 11-12
    Credit: 1/2 unit
    Enrollment: based on reading assessment and recommendation of 10th or 11th grade English teachers
    Open to Grades: 11-12
    This course gives students the opportunity to build reading strategies, to expand vocabulary and to develop comprehension techniques through nonfiction and fiction. Students practice skills necessary for critical reading and analysis of literature, efficient use of time, effective note-taking, studying and test-taking strategies. Reading assessment will determine class placement.

    ELECTIVE CLASSES

    3260 CREATIVE WRITING
    Credit: 1/2 unit
    Open to Grades: 10-12
    This semester course is open to student authors who wish to improve their creative writing skills. It is in a workshop format and requires strong self-motivation and organization, as the student determines most of his or her writing assignments. During the course, students compile a portfolio of rewrites, mini-lessons tailored to meet student needs and spark ideas, and many drafts. Mini-lessons will focus on everything from alternative forms of poetry to using research in writing and using personal experience to formatting dialogue. Students will be encouraged to draft in genres of their choice: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, screenplay, etc. Stretching the imagination and experimenting with new forms and topics are encouraged. Grades will be based on class participation in freewrites and mini lessons, weekly drafting, and the finalized pieces due at the end of each month. The final for this course is revising a work and submitting it for publication.

    3261 CREATIVE WRITING II
    Credit: ½ unit
    Prerequisite: Creative Writing I
    Open to Grades: 10-12
    This semester course is open to student authors who wish to continue to improve their creative writing skills. It is in a workshop format and requires strong self-motivation and organizations, as the student determines most writing assignments. During the course, students compile a portfolio of rewrites, mini-lessons tailored to meet student needs and spark ideas, and many drafts. Mini-lessons will focus on everything from alternative forms of poetry to using research in writing and using personal experience to formatting dialogue. Students will be encouraged to draft in genres of their choice: poetry, fiction creative nonfiction, screenplay, etc. Stretching the imagination and experimenting with new forms and topics are encouraged. Grades will be based on class participation in freewrites and mini lessons, weekly drafting, and the finalized pieces due at the end of each month. Active participation in the annual school writing festival is strongly encouraged. The final for this course is revising work and submitting it for publication.

    3850 FILM APPRECIATION
    Credit: 1/2 unit
    Students must be concurrently enrolled in full-year English course
    Open to Grades: 11-12
    This one-semester course provides an overview of important genres, directors, techniques, and trends in American and foreign films. The course is designed to increase students’ appreciation for film, to provide an understanding of dynamics that shape film, and to expand cultural awareness. The course examines 12-15 films, representing major movements in film history, including film noir, the MGM musical, Hitchcockian suspense, the John Ford western, award-winning foreign work, and modern independent film. Film study concentrates on the analysis of movies as literature, giving scrutiny to plot, character, symbolism, and themes of each landmark film. The course requires serious note-taking, study questions, daily quizzes, exams, and two critical papers. Film Appreciation is an excellent course for students who are serious about the critical study of film and its place in our popular culture.

    3500 JOURNALISM
    Credit: 1 unit of elective credit
    Prerequisites: Freshman Lit & Comp. (may take concurrently)
    Open to Grades: 9-12
    Journalism is a one-year writing course intended for students who like to write, who want to prepare for college writing or who plan to work on the newspaper and the yearbook. Course content includes news writing, features, editorials, advertising, headline writing, sports writing, news analysis, legal and ethical issues, video editing and production, and layout.

    3510 PUBLICATIONS: THE ECHO PAPER
    Credit: 1 unit
    Prerequisites: Journalism & instructor approval
    Open to Grades: 10-12
    The paper staff is chosen from the journalism classes. The staff publishes the monthly school paper and its online version. In alternate years it also prepares the Turkey Day program. Besides the time required for story assignments, staff members spend time outside school hours for page design of the paper and ad solicitation.

    3332 PUBLIC SPEAKING (INTRO TO DEBATE)
    Credit: 1/2 unit
    Open to Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: none
    This is a semester long class that dives into the situations where one would need to address the public. Modeled after the national tournament events, this class explores different types of speeches, public service announcements, radio broadcasting and many other types of formal address.

    3335 DEBATE
    Credit: 1/2 unit
    Open to Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Public Speaking
    This is a semester-long class that dives into the game of debate and deepening the knowledge previously learned in Public Speaking. Modeled after national tournament events, this class explores different types of debate, how to build better cases, constructing solid arguments and delivering strong speeches. Laptops are recommended.

    3345 RADIO BROADCASTING
    Credit: ½ unit
    Open to Grades: 9-12
    In this class, students will explore the business and fundamentals of radio. Each student will be responsible for creating content and script for radio spots that could be used for the Webster Radio station. The course will allow the students to perfect their “On-Air” skills by preparing pre-recorded interviews, creating opinion spots, covering upcoming local events, and by writing stories. The class will also perform pieces that would be included in all of the state level radio broadcasting tournament events (local news, national news, international news, weather, sports, and entertainment news).

    3800 WOMEN, GENDER, AND DIVERSITY ACC
    Credit: 1/2 unit
    Recommendation: Students who earned a “B+” in 10th or 11th grade English have experienced an appropriate yet challenging placement in this course.
    Open to Grades: 11-12
    Women, Gender, and Diversity is an interdisciplinary, advanced credit course for the college-bound student. It provides an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies and introduces students to cultural, political, and historical issues of concern to women. The course familiarizes students with the diversity of women's experiences worldwide and explores representations of women and women's contributions to multiple disciplines, including anthropology, history, sociology, psychology, and literature. The class is discussion-based, taught in a seminar format, and students read and write extensively outside of class. Note: This course will count as a weighted grade and students may receive Advanced College Credit through UMSL.