Gifted

  • These course offerings are available to those identified to receive WGSD Gifted Program services.

    9060 GIFTED & TALENTED 9
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grade: 9
    Gifted 9 is a language arts course for gifted freshmen. Its purpose is to immerse gifted students in literature, writing assignments, activities, and projects that will challenge them while addressing their unique learning styles and affective needs. Freshmen English is a foundations course, so students will study the foundations of literature and the English language. Therefore, this course will cover such basics as the epic, Greek and Shakespearean tragedies, the novel, poetic techniques, the short story, and creative non-fiction. Students will practice various writing techniques. Relevant historical and cultural material will be addressed as well, in order that students may better understand overarching themes and archetypal patterns. Emphasis will be placed on grammar (particularly sentence structure, clarity, and punctuation) and vocabulary (word origins, analogy-building, and ACT/SAT test prep). The largest assignment of the year is the I-Search research project, which also involves out-of-school job-shadowing. It will be written in the second semester. Students are required to read four books over the summer. Note: This course will count as a weighted grade.

    9070 GIFTED & TALENTED 10
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grade: 10
    Gifted 10 is a language arts AP prep course for gifted sophomores. Its purpose is to immerse gifted students in literature, writing assignments, activities, and projects that will challenge them while addressing their unique learning styles and affective needs. Students will study the literary and cultural movements of Europe, beginning with the Anglo-Saxon Era and moving chronologically forward to address the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Enlightenment, and the Romantic and Victorian Eras. They will study seminal literary works and artistic forms from each time period. Relevant cultural and historical background will also be addressed along the way to increase understanding of literary trends and genres. Grammar instruction is weekly, addressing in particular review of all material from the previous year as well as advanced sentence structure and diagramming. Vocabulary instruction will consist of test preparation, etymological studies, and analogy building. The largest writing assignment of the year is the persuasive research paper, which will be written in the second semester. Students are required to read four books over the summer. Note: This course will count as a weighted grade.

    3700 AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE (GIFTED 11)
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grade: 11
    Juniors in the Gifted and Talented Program will study fiction and non-fiction texts with emphasis on American authors and essayists, along with advanced composition and rhetorical strategies. This course focuses on critical thinking and literary analysis. Attention will also be given to students’ affective needs and present areas of interest. Some cross-disciplinary study will occur, particularly with history and the humanities. In addition, students may expect continued work in grammar and vocabulary in preparation for college admissions tests. Students are required to read four books over the summer. At the conclusion of this course, students will have the option to take the AP exam in Language and Composition. Note: This course will count as a weighted grade. College credit will be available.

    3710 AP ENGLISH LITERATURE (GIFTED 12)
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grade: 12
    The student will learn to read and critically analyze four genres of American and British literature; nonfiction, drama, fiction, and poetry. Particular emphasis will be placed on structural and literary analysis. History and cultural back ground will be provided. A student typically writes twelve critical essays, a college essay, poems, and a narrative. To increase vocabulary, the student completes weekly vocabulary lessons. In addition, students conduct an independent research project. Students are required to read four novels over the summer. At the conclusion of the course, students will have the option to take the AP exam in literature. Note: This course will count as a weighted grade.

    8025 GIFTED US GOVERNMENT
    Credit: 1/2 unit
    Open to Grade: 9
    This course is designed to introduce students to the study of our national and state governments. Students will investigate political parties, interest groups, elections, individual freedoms and the institutions of our government even further. Students will not only study the history, structure, and roles of our governmental institutions, but they will also apply their knowledge in several performance based activities and projects. Students must pass the course and state-required exams on the U.S. and Missouri Constitutions to graduate.

    8950 GIFTED PROBLEM SOLVING AND ADVANCED RESEARCH TOPICS IN SOCIAL STUDIES
    Credit: 1/2 unit
    Open to Grades: 9-12
    Students will study self-selected topics from a variety of perspectives – philosophical, historical, anthropological, sociological, economic and scientific. Students will use a variety of real world assets to solve real world problems. Advanced research techniques will be taught along with opportunities for self-actualization. Some possible topics include: logic and language, architecture and urban planning, biomedical research, games and game theory.

    9120 GIFTED ACADEMIC LAB
    Credit: 1 unit
    Open to Grades: 9-12
    Academic Lab provides an opportunity for students to receive additional tutoring and academic support on a daily basis. Teachers are available to students in each lab to provide assistance with regular class work, provide study tips, address affective needs, and monitor grades. Counselors and administrators will occasionally work with students regarding scheduling, college and career planning and other school-related issues.

    5352 INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTIC ENGINEERING-GIFTED
    Credit: 1 Unit
    Open to Grades: 9-12
    This team-taught hands-on introductory Robot Engineering course is designed to introduce the students to the field of robotics and computer programing. This class immerses the student in real world science and technology challenges. Over the course of the year, students strategize, design, build, program (In Robot C+) and test autonomous robots utilizing LEGO MINDSTORMS®, TETRIX®, and other models. Heavy emphasis is placed on acquiring programing skills in relation to motors, servos and sensors. This course will provide the opportunity for students to explore careers in science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM).Students will also develop career and life skills including critical thinking, time management, collaboration and communication. Students in Robot Engineering are strongly encouraged to participate in the Statesman Robotics Team and the FIRST® Tech challenge. This class can be used to satisfy requirements for practical arts.